There are so many truly immense wilderness areas in Northern British Columbia that at 114,444 hectares (282,677 acres), Kwadacha Wilderness Provincial Park seems modest compared to Spatsizi Plateau, Mount Edziza, or Tweedsmuir Provincial Park.

However, the Lloyd George Icefield in Kwadacha Wilderness Park is the largest icefield in the Rocky Mountains north of the 54th parallel.

As the Rockies head towards their northern limit at the 60th parallel (the British Columbia-Yukon border), they begin to diminish somewhat. In Kwadacha, though, they’re still the Rockies: a number of peaks in and surrounding the park crest at 9,100 feet (2,800 metres).

Kwadacha, the Sekani Indian word for white water protects a diversity of habitat that supports ample wildlife, ranging from wolves to Siberian lemmings. If you are a bird enthusiast, this is the place to visit, with over 70 species of birds including grebes, teals, hawks, falcons, kestrels, eagles, warblers and even Lapland Longspurs. Watch for signs of bear activity and make plenty of noise.

There is no road access into the park; it must be reached by air or on horseback. It’s about 90 miles (150 km) of backpacking just to make it to the park from Alaska Highway (beginning just north of Trutch), with many treacherous river crossings: allow 12 to 14 days. The route follows the north side of the Prophet River, then switches into the Muskwa Valley and follows the Muskwa to Fern Lake.

The second trail begins west of the Sikanni Chief on the Alaska Highway and heads northward, eventually joining up with the first trail. There are a number of undeveloped trails in the park, and a few primitive campsites. Trails within this park are not maintained, and only experienced wilderness backpackers and horseback riders should venture here. This is beautiful but unforgiving country.

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided. The park is open year round, if accessible.

Kwadacha Wilderness Provincial Park is located in Northeast BC, about 100 miles (160 km) southwest of Fort Nelson, bordering on Northern Rocky Mountains Provincial Park.

Nearby Regions & Towns

Park Notices